Travel

—Travel


Terrain

Calculate the total travel distance in effective miles by using the distance multipliers on the chart below (i.e. a 20-mile trip over mountains is equivalent to 100 miles over plains, the default terrain, and thus takes five times longer).

Plains: X1
Light Woods: X1.5
Dark Woods: X1.5*
Hills: X1.5
Desert: X1.5***
Wooded Hills: X2
Heavy Woods: X2
Heavy Dark Woods: X2*
Tundra: X3***
Heavy Wooded Hills: X3
Mountains: X3*
Swamp: X4**
Harsh Mountains: X5*
Road: Divide the travel time through any hex with a road by 2

Rough terrain
*
Very rough terrain
***Must make a save against heatstroke or frostbite unless properly dressed

Now that you’ve determined the effective distance between point A and point B, you can determine how long it will take you to get there by dividing by the pace of the slowest party member. A class with a poor BAB has an average pace of 10 miles per day, medium has an average pace of 15 miles per day, and good BAB gets an average of 20 miles per day. If traveling by horse over plains, hills, or any hex with a road, add 20 miles to the average pace.

Every full week of travel time, every party member must make a Fortitude save against fatigue (which means that yes, if you make it from one place to another in six days or less, you can basically travel there for free). The difficulty of the check is dependent upon the hostility of the area, sometimes increased by rough or very rough terrain. The more dangerous a region is, the more careful you must be when traveling through it.

Peaceful Region: 5
Restless Region: 10
Border Region: 15
Dangerous Region: 20
Hostile Region: 25
Rough Terrain: +5
Very Rough Terrain: +10
Traveling in fall or winter: +5
Traveling without a bedroll: +5
Traveling with a tent: -5
Heatstroke: Make a second Fortitude save against the DC 15 (DC 20 in summer), 1d6 heat damage on failure
Frostbite: Make a second Fortitude save against DC 15 (DC 20 in winter), 1d6 cold damage on failure

A Peaceful Region is a region in which you need not care where you go, and are basically never in any danger. Indeed, you need hardly even bother setting a watch at night (though a wise party will still do so). A Restless Region is a region which is under the control of you or your allies, but which is nonetheless prone to some banditry, enemy skirmishers, or the occasional wandering monster, and it is best not to let your guard down. A Border Region is probably de facto a border between you and your enemies, even if de jure it is deep within your territory. Enemies or monsters are frequent and you must be on constant alert for ambushes. Dangerous Regions are regions with no significant presence from you or your allies’ forces, and in which the natives are aggressive. Hostile Regions are firmly controlled by your enemies or totally overrun by monsters, and regardless nearly every living being strong enough to harm you wishes to do so, requiring constant vigilance.

While traveling, you can increase your pace by up to 5 miles per day. Every mile you increase your pace by adds 1 to the DC of the Fortitude save. You can likewise decrease your pace by up to 10 miles, and every 2 miles decreased subtracts 1 from the DC of the Fortitude save. If you fail the Fortitude save, you take 1d6 damage from weariness, ignoring DR (we assume in this system that HP is a representative of your ability to roll with the punches, sometimes to a supernatural degree, but nonetheless it can be decreased by weariness and not just straight damage). You may instead become fatigued, or if you are already fatigued, exhausted, however if you do so, you do not recover until you stop to take a full 24 hours to rest. If fatigued, your average pace slows by 5 miles. If exhausted, your average pace slows by 10 miles. This does mean that characters with an average pace of 10 miles are unable to continue traveling while exhausted and must rest for 24 hours immediately.

If the average EL of the random encounters of an area is lower than your party’s average level by 5 or more (i.e. a level 9 party in an area where the average EL is 4 or lower), treat it as a Peaceful Region no matter what. It doesn’t matter if the place is crawling with Orc patrols if you’re all level 14 and presumably are only walking through the area for the sake of nostalgia, since you could probably just teleport or fly there.


Party Roles

There are three party roles during travel: A survivalist who forages for food and shelter, a guide who makes sure you don’t get lost, and a scout who makes sure you don’t get ambushed. If your party has only one or two members, then at least one member will have to take on two roles, which gives a -2 penalty to each check. This penalty stacks to -4 if one person is attempting all checks by themselves.

The guide makes a check using any of Knowledge (Geography), Knowledge (Local), and Knowledge (Nature) before the party has made their Fortitude saves. If he has at least 5 ranks in one of the Knowledge skills they aren’t using, he gains a +1 competence bonus, and if he has at least 5 ranks in both the Knowledge skills they aren’t using, this bonus increases to +2. The DC for this check is the same as the Fortitude save against weariness. If the Guide fails their roll, increase the DC of the Fortitude save by the same amount as the check failed by (so if the roll was a 14 on a DC 20 check, increase the DC of the Fortitude save by 6). If the Guide succeeds, decrease the DC of the Fortitude save by 1 for every 2 points the skill check’s result exceeded the DC (so if you get a 24 on a DC 20 check, decrease the DC of the Fortitude save by 2). You also decrease the length of the trip by 1 day for every 5 points you exceed the DC (so on a DC 20 check, a result of 25 would decrease the trip’s length by 1 day, and a result of 30 would decrease its length by 2 days, and so on). It is possible to decrease the number of Fortitude saves against weariness required by a journey in this way, which is why the guide makes his roll before the Fortitude saves and not after.

The survivalist makes a Survival skill check against the same DC as the Fortitude save every week after the party has made their Fortitude saves. He can take 10 on this check, but cannot take 20. If he fails, the entire party takes 1d6 damage from poor fed and bad shelter. This also provokes a DC 15 Fortitude save against frostbite if traveling in winter, and everyone who fails takes an additional 1d6 cold damage. If the party has at least one tent per two people, the DC is decreased by 10 since it is much easier to find decent shelter when you don’t have to worry as much about precipitation or how rough the ground is. If the party eats double rations, the survivalist does not need to hunt at all, and can decrease the DC of his Survival check by 10. On the other hand, if the party eats half rations, he’ll need to hunt more, and the DC of the Survival check is increased by 10. If the party decides to subsist purely on what the survivalist can forage, consuming no rations at all, the DC of the Survival check is increased by 15.

The scout makes a Spot or Listen skill check against the same DC as the Fortitude save every week after the party has made their Fortitude saves. They cannot take 10 on this check. If the scout fails, roll on the random encounter table. If the result is a monster, the party is ambushed, and if it is a hazard, the party must make a save. If the scout succeeds, roll on the random encounter table, and if the result is a monster, the party may ambush the enemy or ignore it, and if it is a hazard, the party can ignore it.

In addition to these three vital roles, which /must/ be fulfilled, there are also the two optional roles of cook and entertainer. The same penalties for taking on multiple roles apply, so if you are, for example, both cook and survivalist, you take a -2 to both checks. Both of the cook and the entertainer are fundamentally similar in that they make a roll using a relevant skill (Profession (cook) for the cook and Perform for the entertainer) against a DC equal to that of the Fortitude save. Like the guide’s Knowledge check, they make their check before the party has made their Fortitude saves. If one of them succeeds on the check, they provide a +2 morale bonus to that week’s Fortitude save. If both of them succeed, the bonus is increased to +4. If both of them fail, nothing happens (if no one is fulfilling the role, they are assumed to auto-fail every week).

—Flowchart

1) Guide rolls Knowledge against the base DC. Every 2 points they exceed the DC decreases the DC for every other check by 1. Every point they fail the DC increases the DC for every other check by 1.

2) If you have them, the cook and entertainer make Profession(cook) and Perform checks (respectively). If one is successful, these checks give a +2 morale bonus to the Fortitude saves against weariness. If both are successful, the bonus increases to +4. If they fail, nothing happens.

3) Everyone rolls Fortitude saves against the DC. If you have no bedroll, the DC is increased by 5. If you have a tent, the DC is decreased by 5. If you fail, you take 1d6 damage.

4) The Survivalist rolls Survival against the DC. If the Survivalist fails, everyone takes 1d6 damage. Everyone can eat rations to alleviate half the damage. If everyone has a tent, you can alleviate all of the damage.

5) The Scout rolls Spot or Listen against the DC. If he fails, the party is ambushed by a random encounter. If he succeeds, the party can ambush or avoid the random encounter.

Travel

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